What is the importance of Magnesium?

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Magnesium

Main functions of magnesium:

· Involved in over 300 hundred reactions within the body!

  • Cofactor in hundreds of enzymatic systems
  • Contributes to the production of energy
  • Contributes to the synthesis of DNA
  • Regulates calcium levels along with potassium, zinc, copper, vitamin D and more!
  • Fluid Balance: Magnesium is carefully balanced in the body as one of its electrolytes (carry’s an electric charge when dissolved in the body’s fluids-blood). The majority of magnesium (about 50%) is uncharged and stored in bones or bound to proteins.

· Necessary for:

  • Heart: Needed as a co-factor for healthy function
  • Nerve: Needed as a co-factor for healthy function
  • Kidney: is major regulator of magnesium excretion,
  • Cell function: cofactor in the sodium-potassium pump located in every cell; activates ATP which is necessary for energy production in cells.
  • Brain: Important for proper function, low levels could contribute to migraine
  • Teeth/Bones: Necessary for metabolism
  • Hormones: essential to the production of steroid hormones- DHEA, Testosterone, Estrogen, Progesterone

Foods that it’s found in:

bigstock Food Sources Of Magnesium As P 407292224

Nuts: Brazil, Almonds, Cashews (dry, roasted), Pine nuts(dried), Peanuts (dry, roasted, Hazelnuts

Seeds: Pumpkin, Squash, Sesame, Sunflower

Beans: Soy, White, Black, Lima, Navy, Cowpeas (Black-eyed peas)

Grains: Quinoa, Bran, Buckwheat, Bulgur, Oat bran, Brown rice

Green Veggies: Spinach, Beet greens, Dark green leafy vegetables, Okra, Artichoke hearts

Protein: Mackerel, Pollock, Tofu, Soy milk, Tuna, Cod, Turkey, Halibut, Haddock, Veal, Chicken, T-bone steak, Ground beef

Things to know about magnesium:

  • Due to our agricultural practices, our soil is depleted of this vital nutrient, so most individuals are lacking or are deficient.
  • Magnesium helps with bowel motility
  • Magnesium helps to relieve sore or stressed muscles (think… Epsom-salt bath)
  • Magnesium helps support GABA levels-a neurotransmitter that promotes sleep

References:

Mahan, L. K., & Raymond, J. L. (2016). Krause’s food & the nutrition care process-e-book. Elsevier Health Sciences.

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